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Computer Types
Components
Data types
Memory
Input Hardware
Output Hardware
Storage Devices
Backups
Communication
Software
Networks
Network security
Hacking & viruses
Copyright
Society
Internet issues
Photo distortion
Health
Safety

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GCSE ICT OCR revision notes - 5.1 Index Page


Assessment of unit 5.1 will be through examination.

5.1.1 Computer Systems: Components and Types of System
  • Hardware components of a computer system
  • Software: definition and examples
  • Laptops/notebooks, palmtops and other portable systems
  • Desk-top computers

Candidates should be able to:

  1. define hardware, giving examples;
  2. define software, giving examples;
  3. describe the difference between hardware and software;
  4. identify the main components of a general purpose computer: Central Processing Unit, Main/Internal Memory, Input Devices, Output Devices and Secondary/Backing Storage;
  5. describe the difference between portable (including laptops/notebooks and palmtops) and desktop computers.
5.1.2 Input devices and Output Devices
  • Input devices: identification/use and advantages/disadvantages of different types
  • Output devices: identification/use and advantages/disadvantages of different types

Candidates should be able to:

  1. identify the following input devices: keyboards, pointing devices (including mouse, touch pad and tracker ball), video digitisers, remote controls, joysticks, magnetic stripes, scanners, digital cameras, microphones, sensors, MIDI instruments;
  2. identify suitable uses of the input devices above, stating the advantages and disadvantages of each;
  3. identify the following output devices: monitors, printers (laser, ink jet and dot matrix), plotters, speakers, control devices (including lights, buzzers, robotic arms and motors);
  4. identify suitable uses of the output devices above, stating the advantages and disadvantages of each;
  5. identify relative purchase costs, running costs, quality and speed of different types of printers.
5.1.3 Storage Devices and Media

Candidates should be able to:

  1. describe common backing storage media (such as magnetic tape, CD-ROM, floppy disk and hard disk) and their associated devices;
  2. identify typical uses of the storage media in (1) above;
  3. describe the comparative advantages and disadvantages of using different backing storage media;
  4. define the term backup and describe the need for taking backups;
  5. define the difference between main/internal memory and backing storage, stating the relative benefits of each in terms of speed and permanence.
5.1.4 Introductory Communications

Candidates should be able to:

  1. describe a modem, its purpose and how it is used with analogue telephone lines;
  2. state why it is not necessary to use a modem when using digital telephone lines;
  3. state the difference between analogue data and digital data;
  4. describe the need for conversion between analogue and digital data;
  5. identify the advantages and disadvantages of using common network environments such as the Internet;
  6. describe what is meant by the terms user ids and passwords, stating their purpose and use;
  7. identify a variety of communication media such as fax, e-mail, bulletin boards, and tele/video conferencing.
5.1.5 Data: Types and Terminology
  • Types of data alphanumeric/text, numeric (real and integer), date, logical/Boolean
  • Definition of file, record, field and key field

Candidates should be able to:

  1. identify different data types: logical/Boolean, alphanumeric/text, numeric (real and integer) and date;
  2. select appropriate data types for a given set of data: logical/Boolean, alphanumeric/text, numeric and date;
  3. describe the terms: file, record, field, and key field.
5.1.6 Information Management and Effects of IT: Legal Issues

Candidates should be able to:

  1. describe what is meant by software copyright;
  2. describe what is meant by hacking;
  3. describe what a computer virus is;
  4. explain the measures which must be taken in order to protect against hacking and viruses;
  5. describe the changing patterns of employment including areas of work where there is increased unemployment;
  6. describe the effects of microprocessor-controlled devices in the home including effects on leisure time, social interaction and the need to leave the home;
  7. describe the use of photo editing software to distort reality;
  8. describe the effects of variation in computer access and ICT skills between different people;
  9. describe the capabilities and limitations of ICT and how communications systems have changed our use of ICT;
  10. discuss the issues relating to information found on the Internet, for example unreliability, undesirability and security of data transfer;
  11. describe the potential health problems related to the prolonged use of ICT equipment, for example RSI, back problems, eye problems and some simple strategies for preventing these problems;
  12. describe a range of safety issues related to using computers (electrical, heat, light related) and measures for preventing accidents, particularly in the work place such as not overloading electrical sockets, no trailing wires, no food and drink around the computer, installing fire extinguishers etc.

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